hiking

 

There are an abundance of spectacular walking spots throughout Britain and with enough planning and preparation you can have a great time hiking.

The Coniston Round in the Lake District is especially pleasant on a nice day and it is advisable to head in a clockwise direction to catch the morning light. Speckled with industry you will notice the remains of old mine works, an interesting addition to the beauty of this popular fell. The route is approximately 14 miles long and many hikers make the Old Man their summit. The walk is considered is easy and enjoyable with impressive panoramic views.

The Edale Valley in the Peak District is another popular choice for more experienced hikers. Coming in at approximately 20 miles and taking around 8 hours it’s a must-do if in the area. Starting in Hope village and up to Lose Hill and descend at Winn Hill.

The Calf and Cautley Spout, Howgill Fells in Cumbria has magnificent wild scenery and is rather peaceful and quiet. It is 11.5 miles and takes in some wonderful sights including the Cautley Spout waterfall. You may also see some of the wild horses that live on the fell.

North of the border in Scotland you’ll find Ben Lui, in the southern highlands, at 11.2 miles it will take you just over 6 hours. Ben Lui is considered one of the most underrated mountains in Scotland. It is shapely and interesting and to a veteran hiker will be an absolute delight.

Weymouth to Swannage in Dorset is a fantastic walk if you appreciate coastal scenery. It is a long but leisurely 27 miles where soft, sandy surroundings will carry you along. An epic way to get to know the British coastline.

A priority when planning any of these hikes should be footwear. Inappropriate walking shoes can cause long term damage but the more pressing issue for you will be the immediate affect – pain, discomfort and the capacity to completely ruin your trip. Walking boots are preferable for walks through more complex terrain and you can expect to pay around £70-80 for a good pair. Check out Millet Sports for a great choice of brand, or alternatively you can sometime pick up a decent pair on Ebay. You will have to make the decision yourself on whether you opt for a high-top pair of boots for better ankle support or low-top shoes which tend to be more comfortable.

It would be useful to wear a hat if you are hiking in the sun and it is advisable to carry 2 litres of water with you. Although hiking is free, you should have some cash on you should you want to stop for a drink when you’re done, or if you forget the all-important water.

High-energy snacks would be useful, Clif bars, Trail mix and Snickers are popular choices. Sun protection and maps are also very important, as there are still a lot of places where technology will be of no use to you.

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I've worked as an Occupational Therapist for many years dealing with physical and mental health patients, both in hospitals and the community. Living a healthy, well balanced life with a good diet, regular exercise and a taking a positive outlook are crucial to becoming a very well being indeed - sometimes easier said than done!

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